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What makes us human?

Evolutionary biology and scientific evidence tell us that all humans originated from and evolved from ape-like ancestors over 6 million years ago in Africa. From knowledge gained from the discovery of early human fossils and archaeological remains, it appears that there were probably 15-20 different species of early humans that existed, some beginning as early as several million years ago. These species of humans, called “hominins,” migrated into Asia about 2 million years ago, then into Europe, and the rest of the world much later. While different branches of humans died out, the branch leading to the modern human, Homo sapiens, continued to evolve.

Have you ever?

1. felt dismayed when somebody, in response to, ‘Hi, how are
you?’, doesn’t answer, ‘Fine, thanks’, but starts to tell you
about their health?
2. had a tricky conversation with someone whose name you’ve
forgotten when they clearly know who you are? Should you
ask their name?
3. discovered to your embarrassment that you’ve been walking
along, talking to yourself because your friend stopped a
while ago to look in a shop window?
4. said you’re pleased with your hair in a hairdresser’s, despite
hating it, and can’t wait to leave the shop and comb it out?
5. spent a meal debating with yourself whether to tell the person
you’re eating with that there is some food on their face?
6. asked someone in a supermarket where something is, only
to learn that the person is another customer like yourself?
Or worse, have you had the reverse happen to you?
7. wished that you’d bought some of the things in the trolley
of the person ahead of you in the supermarket queue?
8. found it difficult to keep your smile and patience, after a third
failed attempt when someone is taking a group photograph?
9. felt awkward because after saying a long and affectionate
goodbye to someone you both set off in the same direction?
10. said, ‘We really must meet up again sometime’, when
you really meant ‘Not a chance!’?


What is the difference between human being and being human?

There is a very distinct difference between Being Human and Human Being. The dictionary describes Being human as simply understanding that others are human too. … describes Human Beings as a person, especially as distinguished from other animals or as representing the human species.


Our Mind: Imagination, Creativity, and Forethought: A Blessing and a Curse


The human brain and the activity of its countless neurons and synaptic possibilities contribute to the human mind. The human mind is different from the brain: the brain is the tangible, visible part of the physical body; the mind consists of the intangible realm of thoughts, feelings, beliefs, and consciousness.
Thomas Suddendorf says in his book, “The Gap”:

“Mind is a tricky concept. I think I know what a mind is because I have one — or because I am one. You might feel the same. But the minds of others are not directly observable. We assume that others have minds somewhat like ours — filled with beliefs and desires — but we can only infer those mental states. We cannot see, feel, or touch them. We largely rely on language to inform each other about what is on our minds.” (p. 39)


Storytelling

Thanks to our unique memory, acquisition of language skills, and ability to write, humans around the world, from the very young to the very old, have been communicating and transmitting their ideas through stories for thousands of years, and storytelling remains integral to being human and to human culture.


The Future

No matter how you look at it, humans are unique, and paradoxical. While we are the most advanced species intellectually, technologically, and emotionally, extending our lifespans, creating artificial intelligence, traveling to outer space, showing great acts of heroism, altruism and compassion, we also continue to engage in primitive, violent, cruel, and self-destructive behavior.  

As beings with awesome intelligence and the ability to control and alter our environment, though, we also have a commensurate responsibility to care for our planet, its resources, and all the other sentient beings who inhabit it and depend on us for their survival. We are still evolving as a species and we need to continue to learn from our past, imagine better futures, and create new and better ways of being together for the sake of ourselves, other animals, and our planet.


Resources and Further Reading

https://www.thoughtco.com/what-makes-us-human-4150529

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before

By Jenny Han

MAJOR MOTION PICTURE COMING TO NETFLIX AUGUST 17, 2018!

Lara Jean’s love life gets complicated in this New York Times bestselling “lovely, lighthearted romance” (SLJ) from the New York Times bestselling author of The Summer I Turned Pretty series.

What if all the crushes you ever had found out how you felt about them…all at once?

Sixteen-year-old Lara Jean Song keeps her love letters in a hatbox her mother gave her. They aren’t love letters that anyone else wrote for her; these are ones she’s written. One for every boy she’s ever loved—five in all. When she writes, she pours out her heart and soul and says all the things she would never say in real life, because her letters are for her eyes only. Until the day her secret letters are mailed, and suddenly, Lara Jean’s love life goes from imaginary to out of control.

artistic blossom bright clouds

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

How to introduce yourself so you’ll be unforgettable (in a good way!) — ideas.ted.com

If you can move beyond the boring basics when you’re asked “What do you do?”, you’ll set yourself up for new relationships, opportunities and revelations, says introduction expert Joanna Bloor. Mingling at a work event inevitably means being asked the question “What do you do?” over and over again. After years of repetition and conditioning,…

via How to introduce yourself so you’ll be unforgettable (in a good way!) — ideas.ted.com

The Essentials Of Halina’s Teaching

_Professional_VC
Halina in VC
I am a passionate non- native English teacher from Poland. Teaching is a crucial part of my life. With that understanding, I am a lifelong learner.

I am applying a blended learning/ training and flipped classroom approaches.
The traditional physical classroom settings are not efficient enough, for my lessons.

In my opinion, technology gives us countless new possibilities.
As I have already specified, I prefer blended learning, which means, taking advantage of both, traditional f2f techniques and opportunities confronted with new technologies.

An occasion to meet and connect with people from the entire Globe is one of the reasons I appreciate online communication, very much.

I retired in October 2013 and signed for a freelance Senior Lecturer occupation at the Wroclaw University of Technology.

At present, I am going to continue taking and giving online English courses.

Thinking in a foreign language is precisely what I want my students to accomplish. I teach without a bridge language, or lingua franca was also known as a common language, trade language or even vehicular language. Students do not share any language. I focus on practical communication skills which cover the ability to: speak appropriately with a wide variety of students while maintaining good eye contact, demonstrate a varied vocabulary and tailor the language to your audience. We need to listen effectively, present ideas appropriately, write clearly and in brief and work well in a group. All of these abilities and competencies required excellent communication skills.

When I teach Polish, my foreigners and I have to speak only Polish, and my English classes are run entirely in English.
This means they are required to forget about their native language and start speaking as well as thinking in a foreign language.
My students learn English in different contexts, mostly singing phrases, expressions, collocation, idioms, and phrasal verbs, and also telling stories. Moreover, I encourage them to talk to everybody, even to themselves in a foreign language. As a result of this, they can establish a set of compelling stories. I correct only substantial mistakes. I do not want them to stop talking. I also encourage my students to listen to songs, watch movies with subtitles in a language they learn, read a lot and so forth.
Additionally, to improve a student’s pronunciation, I often use YouTube videos as well as movies with English subtitles and obviously songs.

I believe in using music in English teaching. My approach is that we do not speak the language, but instead we sing it. English bears a unique melody, rhythm as well as intonation.
My students enjoy English lessons with me because they are never bored.

Halina_June_2018_Moment

 

A page full of video tutorials and resources

via Teachers

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EnglishCentral makes teaching English fun and effective by turning popular web videos into
powerful language learning experiences. EnglishCentral allows teachers to sign up students,
select video curriculum, assign goals and track student progress. Perfect for any blended learning
approach and the 21st-century digital classroom.

 

English Lessons with Halina

https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/393adc6c-d96e-437c-acd4-b0e4c4095b23

 

Active English Learning

Active learning helps students start speaking English confidently in less than a year.
Active learning is more than just listening: it involves the active participation of pupils. They must use the language all the time and be emotionally involved in the process.

We need the conversion from Passive Learning to Active Training English Skills

As a language teacher, I use all kinds of tricks just because making students speak and building their self-confidence in keeping the conversation going is the most essential for me.

 

 

Non -Native and Native English Teachers

Native English Teacher or non- Native English Teachers

tylkoja

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Is English a Global Language?

 

The contentious issue of (non)nativeness remains unanswered.
Nowadays, being an NNEST or NNEST should not count but rather teachers’ professional capabilities.
The presentation provides a forum for reflection and discussion about NNESTs.
We should value professional and personal qualities over ‘nativeness.’
The skills and qualities that make an effective language teacher are the most significant.
Both ‘NESTs’ and ‘NNESTs’ are expected to be competent teachers, each with excellent professional skills.
What can non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) perform better?
What can native English-speaking teachers (NESTs) manage better?

 

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