Halina's Thoughts

Home » Posts tagged 'Halina'

Tag Archives: Halina

Sexism, racism, ageism and native speakerism – job ads in ELT

There are NNEST with tremendous language proficiency and phonological ability just as there are NEST with pronunciation and grammar that few would identify as native and vice-versa.

Would you like to learn English from me?

Don’t forget, I am a non- native English teacher.Picture 18

TEFL Equity Advocates

Earlier this year Marek Kiczkowiak and I gave a talk at TESOL Spain in Vitoria-Gasteiz about native speakerism in teacher training (you can download the ppt here).  In preparation for the talk, I set up a survey on general issues of discrimination in ELT to get an idea of different attitudes about discrimination in general, but predominantly to look at native speakerism; that is, the prejudice against individuals based on their mother tongue or perceived ‘nativeness’.  The survey features a series of ELT job adverts with examples of language which could be interpreted as discriminatory.  Participants were simply asked to judge if the language was discriminatory and if it was, was the discrimination justified in the context provided.  The scenarios were as follows.

  • A women’s college in Saudi Arabia seeking only female teachers.
  • A summer camp for teenagers seeking only teachers aged 18-30.
  • A private language school in Prague…

View original post 1,232 more words

Invitation to my English Classes

English for Everybodyimages

Angielski_Ulotka_New1

The Native Factor: the discussion continues

Non- native English Teacher.
Let’s be the majority, not the minority. We shake our heads at the unpleasant (often an understatement!) things our ancestors have done in the name of labels and arbitrary categories, but let’s remember that we also need to shake our heads and stand up against what’s happening now. This is the only way to rid our profession of discrimination and ensure that we have qualified teachers teaching English rather than people who have been hired because their first language is a particular variety of English and (in some cases) because they have white skin.

Lizzie Pinard

Hands up, dear readers, those who of you who think I am a ‘native speaker’ of British English.

Flag_-_Union_Flag

Hands up if you think I am from England.

“Where are you from?”

It’s one of the earliest questions we teach learners how to ask. And yet it can be one of the most difficult and complicated to answer.

I was born in Chichester, a little town in the south of England.

Screen Shot 2016-04-17 at 14.38.14

I’ve never lived there. I spent the first two years of my life in a little village near Bognor Regis (Felpham, for any Sussex dwellers!). My earliest memories of this part of England, though, come from visits to relatives subsequent to moving to the other end of the world.

From the age of 2 to the age of 17, I lived in Botswana, though I went to a boarding school in South Africa (Mafeking) for secondary school. 2000px-Flag_of_Botswana.svgsf-lgflag

My mum is English…

View original post 1,934 more words

IATEFL Online

ITEFL

Birmingham Online Registered Bloggers | IATEFL Online

I am proud to be  a Birmingham Online Registered Blogger

Some of the  sessions which we were able to watch online.

Thursday 14th April 2016

Today’s  Live Schedule | IATEFL Online

0900-1010 Plenary Silvana Richardson

Silvana RichardsonThe ‘native factor’, the haves and the have-nots

…and why we still need to talk about this in 2016. It is often claimed that much has changed in the eld of English Language Teaching since 1983, when Peter Medgyes rst described the struggle of ‘non-native’ teachers for visibility and due recognition. But has it? Away from academic circles, where the discourses that equated the ideal teacher with the ‘native speaker’ have been interrogated and critiqued, how has the situation really changed for the professional teacher of English whose rst or home language is a language other than English?
In this talk I will draw on research studies, anecdotal evidence and my own and my colleagues’ personal experiences to examine the state of equality and social justice in ELT with reference to the so-called ‘non- native speaker teacher’ thirty years on. I will look at how the logic of the market is used to justify current discriminatory recruitment practices that still perpetuate the view that a(n unquali ed) native speaker is preferable to a quali ed and professional ‘non-native teacher’.
I will re ect on the impact of the native-speaker bias and its dominance on developments in English Language teaching methodology, and how this dominance seems to have affected the emergence of context-appropriate pedagogies. Finally, I will address the ‘second best’ view of the ‘non-native teacher’ and its impact on their own construction of a legitimate professional identity and on their con dence in themselves as teachers, users and experts of an-other language.

10:45    interview with Wendy Arnold & Coralyn Bradshaw

11:00    interview with Nick Bilbrough

11:15    interview with Andrew Foster

11:30    interview with Shaike Francis Sefalane (Hornby scholar)

11:45    interview with Alireza Safar (Hornby scholar)

12:00    interview with Adrian Underhill

12:15    interview with Vuyokazi Makubalo & Pipit Suharto & Urmila Khaled (Hornby scholar)

12:30    interview with Carol Read

12:45    interview with Roohi Malik

13:00-14:00    break

14:00    interview with Larissa Goulart da Silva & Maria Soledad Loutayf & Praphatsorn Wongchaiwa (Hornby scholars)

14:15   interview with Thorsten Merse

14:30   interviews by Paul Braddock

14:45   interviews by Paul Braddock

15:00   interview with Melanie Aplin

15:15   interview with Judy Boyle

15:30   interview with Ben Gray and Seamus Harkin

15:45   interview with Harisimran Sandhu

16:00   interview with Neil McLaren

16:15   interview with Amadeu Marin

16:30   end of live interviews

– See more at:

https://iatefl.britishcouncil.org/2016/live-schedule#sthash.81H29y4B.dpuf

Language Learning Theories

https://www.youtube.com/embed/BHp-8tYgQIs“>Language Learning Theories

Learning Theories

  • What learning theories do you follow and why?
  • How do you incorporate them into your teaching? Try to be as specific as you can.

How People Learn

Today, the primary theory is socio-constructivist—in which knowledge is understood to be importantly shaped by the context in which it is situated, and is actively constructed through social negotiation with others. On this understanding, learning environments should be where:

  • Constructive, self-regulated learning is fostered
  • The learning is sensitive to the context
  • It will often be collaborative

Theoretical concepts do not yield concrete prescriptions for classroom application, but the good theory can be used flexibly and creatively by teachers in their planning and educational practice. At the same time, not all learning takes place in the classroom as much of it occurs at home, on the sports field, in museums and so forth (non-formal education), and sometimes implicitly and effortlessly (informal learning).

In the mid-1950s, humanistic psychologist Abraham Maslow created a theory of basic, psychological and self-fulfillment needs that motivate individuals to move consciously or subconsciously through levels or tiers based on our inner and outer satisfaction of those met or unmet needs. I find this theory eternally relevant for students and adults, especially in today’s education.

 

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/addressing-our-needs-maslow-hierarchy-lori-desautels

Become an active learner. The brain works on a use-it-or-lose-it style, meaning you must apply whatever you learn.

And then use the new phrase or character in a real situation: with a language partner or writing online.

Learning the words and phrases through original videos makes them stick quickly, making you learn faster.

Make language learning a passion.

Merge the fun of language learning with the commitment to follow through. Knowing that you want to learn a new language is not enough to get us actually to take action. Give yourself clarity on what exactly compels you to learn a new language. Figure out the why behind your desire to learn. What’s the goal behind the goal? What’s the bigger picture here? How will learn a new language open opportunities in your future? Just answering these questions for yourself will motivate you to much higher level to take action when necessary.

 

 

Welcome to Halina’s Conversational English online course

Video

Welcome to Halina’s Conversational English online course

By Halina Ostańkowicz- Bazan

I have been teaching languages for over 40 years.I taught Polish as foreign languages in traditional settings at the Wroclaw University of Technology for about 41 years.

In 2010, I started my online adventure mainly on WizIQ. Since that time I have been using technology in my classes.I have been teaching English to speakers of other languages for over 25 years. I have been coaching both face-to-face and in blended learning arrangements.

Overview

  • Are you unsatisfied with your level of English?
  • Do you want to become a forward-thinking speaker and reach to a great extent fluency?
  • If so, my course is for you!

 

Throughout my online course, participants will be able to ask questions before (in the course-ware), during the Virtual Class (in the chat box), and after (in the course-ware).

For the duration of the ten live lessons, I will show you exactly what you need to do to make fast progress and achieve your dream of being able to speak English spontaneously as well as naturally. I will go through the approach based on your learning style and show you the best methods and techniques so that you will make unbelievable progress.
You will learn how you can do this even if you have a very busy schedule; my methods can be used by anyone no matter how full of activity you are. What’s more, I’ll also share with you the best resources so that you don’t have to spend time looking for the top websites, books, and apps. I always offer content in different formats. For example, if you watch the video, I will also provide a transcript of the video.

I avoid large classes to be able to connect with students on a less formal, personal level; to have a much better opportunity of engaging learners in the course material.

Don’t worry if you miss a lesson: each session is recorded and can be viewed at any time (even after the course has finished). You can also download all lesson notes from the chat box, interact with myself and colleague learners, and participate in enjoyable challenges.

Don’t miss this chance to learn specifically what you need to improve your English. Anyone can achieve an advanced level and further, and this course will show you how as well as help you to expand your language skills.

ABOUT THE COURSE

I offer;

  • 10 Virtual Interactive Classes on WizIQ. All classes will be recorded for those who cannot attend.
  • New Technologies such as Videos, Blogs, Social Media and exciting assignments are counted
  • The long-lasting right of entry to the course materials.
  • The best for pre-intermediate or intermediate learners who want to get to a higher level.

The classes will be given one time a week every Saturday at 17.00 pm UTC/GMT for ten weeks.

Participants have to use (UTC/GMT) Time Zone Converter to check an exact time of the course

http://www.worldtimeserver.com/convert_time_in_UTC.aspx

http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

 

Unique Feature:

I will provide additional Skype sessions where you can take advantage of the variety activities and practice online speaking.

Course Package:

  • Access to downloadable class recordings
  • Course related PPT’s, PDF’s and word document files are available to the students
  • F2F oral exams for speaking practice on Skype
  • Practice in a variety English speaking settings

Key Takeaways:

 

  1. Improve fluency and speaking skill
  2. Enhance your pronunciation
  3. Get ready for a variety English speaking environments

COURSE OUTLINE

VC One: An introduction to the values of being fluent in English as well as how not to learn foreign languages to escape from common learning mistakes.

VC Two: Motivation, involvement and a challenge are essential. Being passionate about learning English online from a good language teacher is an excellent start.

VC Three: Learning using traditional methods, memorizing single words and grammar rules should be avoided.

I am against methods that emphasize learning about the language but for learning by using the language? / expressions, collocations, models, patterns, language chunks /

VC Four: Practice technics to improve pronunciation and the methods required to advance your speaking skills powerfully.

VC Five: Music in English Teaching helps you get into the routine of learning English.

Learn how to keep the conversation going with all kinds of speakers and how to set goals, also, to getting into the habit of learning English

VC Six: Learning English with song’s lyrics.@ A

VC Seven: Learning English with song’s lyrics.@ B

VC Eight: Learning English with song’s lyrics.@ C

VC Nine: Learning English with song’s lyrics.@ D

VC Ten: Storytelling and final discussion.

Being creative is a must in the language classroom.

In one of the TED talks, Sir Ken Robinson said that creativity is as important as literacy and as such must be promoted in any classroom. Nowadays, however, most Foreign Language syllabuses follow the testing-oriented approach to allow for more objective assessment of the students.

For recognizable reasons, the testing-oriented approach does not generate a context for learners being creative. Therefore, creativity is not promoted or is even excluded in total.

In my course, I will argue that in the context of Foreign Language Learning and Teaching creativeness is essential. It leads to a better and faster assimilation of language material, and it generates a richer language environment. Moreover, inventiveness unpredictably enough may produce better test results, no matter the learners level is.

Halina Ostańkowicz- Bazan

 

Emaze

https://app.emaze.com/@AIFQCRQL/presentation-name?autoplay

I am trying to use EMAZEPowered by emaze

%d bloggers like this: