Halina's Thoughts

Home » Posts tagged 'methods'

Tag Archives: methods

English as an International Language – lesson plan by Sarah Priestley

4Thank you very much for the post by Sarah Priestley.
I am going to use this lesson plan, starting from today.

TEFL Equity Advocates

This lesson plan can be adapted to any level from Intermediate to C2, depending on the difficulty of the audio recordings you use in the listening stage 3 and the vocabulary used in stage 4.  I did it in an 80 minute lesson with a C2 adult class.  If you’re short of time you could skip stage 2 (the discussion) or shorten the number of tasks for this part. You can download the pdf handout here

1. Warmer

Don’t tell ss the topic of the lesson yet.  Instead, ask them to note down the qualities of a good language teacher. Get them to compare with a partner and have brief group feedback.  Here’s what my C2 conversation class came up with in June 2016:

4Interestingly enough, I asked my group whether knowledge of the language was a quality to consider, as I noticed that nobody had mentioned it.  They…

View original post 711 more words

Plenary by Diane Larsen-Freeman

 

Please, click on the link to watch the video.

//www.viddler.com/embed/625bd95b/?f=1&offset=0&autoplay=0&player=full&secret=46342320&disablebranding=0&view_secret=46342320


IATEFL Online Birmingham 2016 Registered Blogger

Presenter(s):
Diane Larsen-Freeman
Session details:

Shifting metaphors from computer input to ecological affordances

Fifty years ago, around the same time that IATEFL was founded, inquiries into the nature of additional language learning were begun. One of the earliest avenues of inquiry concerned the nature of the linguistic input that language learners were exposed to. Not only was the input thought to be the raw material that the learners had to work with, linguistic input was also thought to be a driving force in second language development. Researchers sought to demonstrate the effect of the input on what was called learners’ output.
While this line of research been fruitful in contributing to our understanding of language learning, it has been encumbered by the use of its computer-related metaphors of input and output. Clearly, our students are not computers. We know that the way we talk influences and reflects the way we think. One problem with “input” is that it ascribes passivity to learners, robbing them of their agency. Another problem is that it suggests that there is a conduit between input and output. It overlooks the meaning-making nature of language use. A third problem is that the use of “input” necessitates all sorts of terminological profusion, such as “intake” and “uptake.” At this point, there is a need to move beyond input-output metaphors to embrace a new way of understanding, one informed by Complexity Theory with its ecological orientation – one of affordances.
Affordances are two-way relationships between the learner and the environment. Affordances afford opportunities for action on the part of learners, provided that the affordances are perceived by learners. In this way, learners create their own affordances. Thus, affordances restore agency to learners. This also partially explains why learners’ developmental patterns are different. In this presentation, I will elaborate on affordances and discuss the implications of affordances for English language learning and teaching.
– See more at:

http://iatefl.britishcouncil.org/2016/session/plenary-diane-larsen-freeman#sthash.6QROcfKn.dpuf

Blended Learning vs Flipped Learning

Blended Learning vs Flipped

Polish Easter

Polish Easter Traditions-2014

 

 

 

 

Language Learning Theories

Learning Theories
There are 12 learning theories:
• Constructivism TTO-Vance-Stevens-8868 (1)
• Behaviorism
• Piaget’s Developmental Theory
• Neuroscience
• Brain-Based Learning
• Learning Styles
• Multiple Intelligences
• Right Brain/Left Brain
• Thinking
• Communities of Practice
• Control Theory
• Observational Learning
• Vygotsky and Social Cognition
http://www.funderstanding.com/about_learning.cfm.
In the mid-1950s, humanistic psychologist Abraham Maslow created a theory of basic, psychological and self-fulfillment needs that motivate individuals to move consciously or subconsciously through levels or tiers based on our inner and outer satisfaction of those met or unmet needs. I find this theory eternally relevant for students and adults, especially in today’s education.
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/addressing-our-needs-maslow-hierarchy-lori-desautels
Learning means bringing changes, by learning human enters new society and culture. When they learned new understanding, they perform on it. Otherwise, they lose it.
As stated earlier, learning transfers changes (behaviorism) and creates new knowledge or increases information (cognitive skills). Education empowers our brain and beliefs, so it encourages our intellectual power to improve knowledge.

Most important theories related to language learning.
1. Behaviorist,
2. Cognitive,
3. Constructivism,
4. Chomsky’s Universal Grammar
5. Schumann’s Acculturation / Orientation in a new culture,
6. Krashen’s Monitor
7. Conversation
The conversation theory is a transdisciplinary learning theory. Developed by Gordon Pask in 1975, it is influenced by a range of cybernetics, linguistics, computer science concepts, cognitive psychology, and neurophysiology.

WHAT LEARNING THEORIES DO YOU FOLLOW AND WHY?
How do you incorporate them into your teaching? Try to be as specific as you can.
I use the mix of different theoriesIt depends on the kind of my students.
In my view, theoretical concepts do not yield concrete prescriptions for classroom application, but the good theory can be used flexibly and creatively by teachers in their planning and educational practice. At the same time, not all learning takes place in the classroom as much of it occurs at home, on the sports field, in museums and so forth (non-formal education), and sometimes implicitly and effortlessly (informal learning).
Non-formal education and informal learning are vital for improving language learning.
How People Learn and What are their Learning Styles?
This is my video about the topic

Learning Styles

Nowadays the dominant theory is socio-constructivism which can be defined as an approach according to which individual knowledge relies on its social construction of it. (Piaget, Doise and Mugny, 1984). Particularly relevant in this respect are the communication processes (learning dialogs) occurring in situations where at least two persons try to solve a problem. The social world of a learner includes the people that directly affect that person, including teachers, friends, students, administrators, and participants in all forms of activities. Accordingly, learning designs should enhance local collaboration and dialogue but also engage other actors (e.g. domain experts) to participate in certain ways. Research on collaborative learning is particularly interested in learning mechanisms that are triggered by specific collaborative activities.
Key functionalities of a socio-constructivist learning environment are:
• Reflection & Exchange
• Scaffolding & Storyboarding
• Facilitation & Content
• Monitoring & Assessment
• Production, Investigation, etc.
• Psychological support & Community.
http://edutechwiki.unige.ch/en/Socio-constructivism
Theoretical concepts do not produce actual prescriptions for classroom application, but the good theory can be used flexibly and creatively by teachers in their planning and educational practice. At the same time, not all learning takes place in the classroom as much of it occurs at home, on the sports field, in museums and so forth (non-formal education), and sometimes implicitly and effortlessly (informal learning).
In the mid-1950s, humanistic psychologist Abraham Maslow created a theory of basic, psychological and self-fulfillment needs that motivate individuals to move consciously or subconsciously through levels or tiers based on our inner and outer satisfaction of those met or unmet needs. I find this theory increasingly relevant for students and adults, especially in today’s education.
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/addressing-our-needs-maslow-hierarchy-lori-desautels
Additionally, I would like to highlight Constructivism as one of the hot topics in educational philosophy right now. It potentially has profound inferences for how current `traditional’ instruction is structured, since it goes with several highly exposed educational trends, for example:
• the transition of the teacher’s role from “sage on the stage” (fount/transmitter of knowledge) to “guide on the side” (facilitator, coach);
• teaching “higher order” skills such as problem-solving, reasoning, and reflection (for example, see also creative learning);
• enabling learners to learn how to learn;
• increasing flexibility in the evaluation of learning outcomes;
• cooperative and collaborative learning skills.

For me, language learning through conversation and open communication is the most effective teaching technique.
I want my students to become active learners. As the brain works on a use-it-or-lose-it style, means students must apply whatever they learn.
It is necessary to use the new phrase or character in a real situation. Also learning the words and phrases through original videos helps to learn faster.
Moreover, I encourage my students to make language learning a passion.
I combine the fun of language learning with the commitment to follow through. They should remember that feeling the need to learn a new wording is not enough to take an action. Give yourself clarity on what exactly compels you to learn a new language.
My tips are;
• Figure out the how to comprehend a desire to learn.
• What’s the goal behind it?
• What’s the bigger picture?
• How will learn a new language open opportunities in future?
• Just answering these questions will motivate learners to get to the much higher level to take action when necessary.
http://www.learning-theories.com/

Learning: Theory and Research

Learning theory: models, product and process

http://tip.psychology.org/
learn
http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/theories.htm
https://ows.edb.utexas.edu/site/sara%C3%ADs-e-porfolio/theories-language-learning

Wideo, WeVideo, and Magisto – Three Good Tools for Creating Videos Online

Wideo, WeVideo, and Magisto – Three Good Tools for Creating Videos Online.

Wideo is a neat video creation service that allows anyone to create animated videos and Common Craft-style videos online through a simple drag-and-drop process. A couple of months ago Wideo started offering templates to help users start their video projects. Wideo templates provide a basic framework for a video’s theme. A couple of the templates that might be of interest to teachers are the slideshow template and the curriculum template.

Welcome to ELT Straight Talk

Straight talking from teachers and learners, where teachers and students will share their experiences about the ways they teach and learn.

via Welcome to ELT Straight Talk.

%d bloggers like this: